yahighway
A lot of people are surprised to learn that back in 1800, 90 percent of American teachers were actually male. Today we know that actually 76 percent of [them are] female, so how did this huge flip happen?

The answer is that as school reformers began to realize in the 1820s that schooling should be compulsory — that parents should be forced to send their kids to school, and public education should be universal — they had to come up with a way to do this basically in an affordable manner, because raising taxes was just about as unpopular back then as it is now. So what we see is this alliance between politicians and education reformers in the early 19th century to redefine teaching as a female profession.

They do this in a couple ways: First, they argue that women are more moral in a Christian sense than men. They depict men as alcoholic, intemperate, lash-wielding, horrible teachers who are abusive to children. They make this argument that women can do a better job because they’re more naturally suited to spend time with kids, on a biological level. Then they are also quite explicit about the fact that [they] can pay women about 50 percent as much — and this is going to be a great thing for the taxpayer.
mashable

mashable:

This week, computer programmer Ada Lovelace’s legacy is being celebrated with events around the world designed to encourage women to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). 

So who was Lovelace? In 1843, at age 27, Lovelace envisioned the future of computer technology as we know it — nearly a hundred years before the first computer was even invented.

Learn more about Lovelace and her groundbreaking work here.

impressionsonmymind
kandidcamera:

irisblasi:

theatlanticcities:

“‘There’s always that joke that there’s a Starbucks on every corner,’ says Justin Grimes, a statistician with the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington. ‘But when you really think about it, there’s a public library wherever you go, whether it’s in New York City or some place in rural Montana. Very few communities are not touched by a public library.’
In fact, libraries serve 96.4 percent of the U.S. population, a reach any fast-food franchise can only dream of.” 
There are more public libraries (about 17,000) in America than there are McDonalds (about 14,000) or Starbucks (about 11,000).
Read: Every Library and Museum in America Mapped
[Click here for the original map]

This makes me happy.

YES!!  Lets keep it that way, shall we? 

kandidcamera:

irisblasi:

theatlanticcities:

“‘There’s always that joke that there’s a Starbucks on every corner,’ says Justin Grimes, a statistician with the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington. ‘But when you really think about it, there’s a public library wherever you go, whether it’s in New York City or some place in rural Montana. Very few communities are not touched by a public library.’

In fact, libraries serve 96.4 percent of the U.S. population, a reach any fast-food franchise can only dream of.” 

There are more public libraries (about 17,000) in America than there are McDonalds (about 14,000) or Starbucks (about 11,000).

Read: Every Library and Museum in America Mapped

[Click here for the original map]

This makes me happy.

YES!!  Lets keep it that way, shall we? 

eternalacademic
hi-coup:

cloudcuckoolander527:

yayfeminism:

One would assume that scientists, who are trained to think objectively, are completely immune to gender discrimination. However, a recent Yale study by Corinne Moss-Racusin and colleagues suggests otherwise.
The researchers created a fictional student and sent out the student’s application to science professors at top, research-intensive universities in the United States. The professors were asked to evaluate how competent this student was, how likely they would be to hire the student, how much they would pay this student, and how willing they would be to mentor the student. All of the applications sent out were identical, except for the fact that half were for a male applicant, John, and half were for a female applicant, Jennifer. Results showed that, with statistical significance, both male and female faculty at these institutions were biased towards male students over female students.
Data from the study shows that on average, science faculty was willing to pay the male applicant about $4,000 more per year. source

"The gender gap doesn’t exist" 
"We don’t need feminism" 
"Maybe he just worked harder"
"*any MRA bullshit*"

I had to read this study for class. It is thorough as fuck.

hi-coup:

cloudcuckoolander527:

yayfeminism:

One would assume that scientists, who are trained to think objectively, are completely immune to gender discrimination. However, a recent Yale study by Corinne Moss-Racusin and colleagues suggests otherwise.

The researchers created a fictional student and sent out the student’s application to science professors at top, research-intensive universities in the United States. The professors were asked to evaluate how competent this student was, how likely they would be to hire the student, how much they would pay this student, and how willing they would be to mentor the student. All of the applications sent out were identical, except for the fact that half were for a male applicant, John, and half were for a female applicant, Jennifer. Results showed that, with statistical significance, both male and female faculty at these institutions were biased towards male students over female students.

Data from the study shows that on average, science faculty was willing to pay the male applicant about $4,000 more per year. 
source

"The gender gap doesn’t exist" 

"We don’t need feminism" 

"Maybe he just worked harder"

"*any MRA bullshit*"

I had to read this study for class. It is thorough as fuck.